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Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Indicator 5. Analyze purposeful use of language

Objective a. Analyze specific word choice that contributes to the meaning and/or creates style

Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Item

Read this article titled "The Fosbury Flop." Then answer the question below.

Explain how the author helps a reader feel the excitement of Fosbury's experience in the 1968 Olympics. In your response, use information from the article that supports your explanation. Write your answer in the box below.

Sample Student Response #1

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Score for Sample Student Response #1: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is completely incorrect.


Sample Student Response #2

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #2: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is irrelevant to the question.


Sample Student Response #3

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Score for Sample Student Response #3: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student uses minimal information to explain how the author helps the reader feel the excitement, "Fosbury got better and better…the number went higher and higher…like watching your favorite basketball player succeed."


Sample Student Response #4

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Score for Sample Student Response #4: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student uses minimal information to explain that the author shows excitement by "taking them through the rounds, using descriptive details…building anticipation."

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader responds that the author creates excitement "by taking them through the rounds, using descriptive details and showing the trials they went through" and concludes that anticipation was building. In a vague manner, the reader references sequences of events and indicates they made the reader anticipate the conclusions. To improve this response, the reader might focus on the idea of anticipation and then cite information from the text that would support the idea. For example, citing such information as 80,000 spectators at these events, the competition wearing on, the verbs concentrate, race, leap, rocked, sprinted, and Fosbury closing his eyes before the final jump.


Sample Student Response #5

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Score for Sample Student Response #5: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student uses text-relevant information to show how the author helps the reader feel the excitement of the 1968 Olympics, "he missed the first two tries, and if he missed the last try he wouldn't get a gold metal, so there was alot of suspense."

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers that the author built suspense by giving information about Fosbury's two missed tries that preceded the successful attempt that won the gold medal. To improve this response, the reader might focus on additional information that would clarify the building suspense. For example, the difference between a loss and gain for Fosbury would be an Olympic gold medal, an Olympic record, and further proof that his jumping style worked.


Sample Student Response #6

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Score for Sample Student Response #6: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student uses text-relevant information to explain how the author makes the reader feel excitement, "…by going at every thing one by one, step by step…made Fosbury think about, the gold medal…possibility of a broken record."


Sample Student Response #7

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Score for Sample Student Response #7: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student effectively uses text-relevant information to explain that the author helps the reader feel the excitement of the Olympics by "describing everything as if it were in slow motion." The student extends this idea by explaining that this method "makes a reader feel nervous anticipation…leaves us in excited suspense until the very end."

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers that the author helps the reader feel excitement by describing all the events as if they were in slow motion. Then the reader cites a particular sentence where each small action is recorded, which supports the idea of slow motion. Finally, the reader states that the reader is kept in a state of "nervous anticipation." This reader answers the question by focusing on how the information is relayed rather than the specific words that are being used. To improve this response, the reader might further clarify his/her ideas by stating that although a reader might strongly suspect the conclusion of this article, the author delays confirming that conclusion.


Sample Student Response #8

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #8: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student effectively uses text-relevant information to explain how the author makes the reader feel the excitement of the Olympics. The student clearly explains that the author "makes the reader feel nervous and excited" by talking "about many of the different jumps one by one." The student extends understanding by explaining that the author uses techniques that make the story very tense and enthralling.


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

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