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Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Indicator 6. Read critically to evaluate informational text

Objective b. Analyze the extent to which the structure and text features clarify the purpose and the information

Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Item

Read this article titled "This Tongue Gets a Grip." Then answer the question below.

Explain what could be added to help a reader better understand the information in this article. In your response, use information from the article that supports your explanation. Write your answer in the box below.

Sample Student Response #1

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #1: Rubric Score 0

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response is irrelevant to the question.


Sample Student Response #2

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #2: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student suggests an addition to the article, “…more information about why and how a chameleon changes it’s color,” and explains using minimal information, “…spent most of the time talking about the chameleons tongue and how they eat.”


Sample Student Response #3

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #3: Rubric Score 1

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. The student suggests an addition to the article, “…more pictures and captions,” and explains using minimal information, “…you could see more of the details…only has one picture…doesn’t show the suction cups or mucus.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers “more pictures and captions” would help a reader see more details and that the single picture “doesnt show the suction cups or mucus.” To improve this response, the reader might explain how a picture of the suction cup formed on the chameleon’s tongue and the mucus covering the suction cup would increase comprehension. For example, the close-up photograph might clarify the information in the sections “Sticky Tongue” and “Discovering the Secret.”


Sample Student Response #4

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #4: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student indicates that no addition to the article is needed, “I don’t think anything else needs to be added,” explains this position, “There is already more than enough supporting details,” and uses text-relevant information to give an example, “…the suction effect…backed up and proved by scientists….”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers that nothing else is needed for understanding and addresses text support that shows that the suction effect of a chameleon’s tongue has been proven by scientists. To improve this response, the reader might cite specific text that shares how the forming of a suction cup on the chameleon’s tongue and the covering of mucus work to catch and secure prey for the chameleon. To extend this response, the reader could note that the scientists and the universities where they work speak to the reliability of the information.


Sample Student Response #5

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #5: Rubric Score 2

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. The student proposes an addition to the article, “…pictures could have been added,” and explains using text-relevant information, “steps the chameleon goes through catching its prey…pictures of this in sequential order…I would have a better grasp.”


Sample Student Response #6

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #6: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student proposes an addition to the article, “…how the chameleons use camaflauge to catch their prey.” The student effectively uses text-relevant information to explain, “…talents for changing colors…don’t say how it associates with a chameleon catching its prey.” The student clarifies the purpose of this addition, “By not associating…it sounds like the chameleon just sits in the open, visible for all to see.”

Instructional Annotation: (While the Annotation, Using the Rubric describes the scorerís explanation for the rubric score, the Instructional Annotation describes how the response might be improved.)
The reader answers “more on how the chameleons use camaflauge to catch their prey” would assist understanding. The reader wants to know how camouflage in conjunction with the chameleon’s tongue suction work together and provides text support for the suggestion. To improve this response, the reader might extend the assertion by questioning whether the camouflage appearance of the chameleon allows it to get to places where prey is abundant.


Sample Student Response #7

image of student response

Score for Sample Student Response #7: Rubric Score 3

Annotation, Using the Rubric: This response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. The student proposes an addition to the article, “A detailed illustration of a chameleon’s mouth or tongue.” The student explains, “…readers are usually visual learners…need an illustration…to see the chameleon’s tongue.” The student extends understanding by explaining, “…’they have an extraordinary tongue,’ …but what exactly does the tongue look like?”


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

/share/rubrics/msa/reading/xml/bcr.xml
/toolkit/vsc/assessment_items/msa_ela_8_058.xml