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Sample Item Scoring Information Return

Standard 3.0 Comprehension of Literary Text

Indicator 4. Use elements of poetry to facilitate understanding

Objective d. Identify and explain other poetic elements such as setting, mood, tone, etc., that contribute to meaning

Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Item

Read the poem 'Carousel'. Then answer the following.
Explain how the speaker of the poem "Carousel" feels about riding a carousel. In your response, use details and examples from the poem that support your explanation. Write your answer on your answer document.
Sample Student Response #1

Student Response

Annotation: The reader responds "the author feels happy because…he uses happy words about the carousel." The reader answers the question but fails to use text to support the idea. To improve this response, the reader should use text that supports the idea of "happy words" like magic, dream, or spellbound and then explain why those words show happiness. Also the reader needs to distinguish between the author/poet and the speaker of the poem.


Sample Student Response #2

Student Response

Annotation: The reader responds "she feels royal…because the are such beautiful and fine horses" and continues "gold poles and lavender sadles which are royal colors." The reader does answer the question and offers text support for the idea of royalty using prior knowledge about colors associated with royalty. To improve this response, the reader should expand upon the valid idea of royalty citing "a kingdom of horses" and "a medley of ponies…" Next the reader should explain how multiple ponies, "kingdom of horses," "golden poles," and "lavender" saddles show the idea of royalty. For example, "kingdom of horses" might refer to a place where horses reign or might refer to a huge number of horses which someone with wealth like royalty might own.


Sample Student Response #3

Student Response

Annotation: The reader responds "he likes it because he is writing about it" but maintains that the speaker doesn't really say as much as would be possible. The response continues that the reader doesn't believe he/she could do a better job and concludes that "he uses lots of detail and exspetion." The reader does answer the question. To improve this response, the reader should focus on the idea that the speaker appears to like riding the carousel and use text to support the idea of liking the experience. For example, in the last line of the poem "merrily go round" the use of the word "merrily" which refers to happiness or joy also shows liking for the activity.


Sample Student Response #4

Student Response

Annotation: The reader responds "the author likes to ride the carousel" and cites text to support the response "… 'Merrily go round,' 'To dream as they sail,' and 'Such spinning is magic.'" The reader draws a conclusion about each piece of text showing how each shows that the author enjoys the experience. The reader answers the question, uses valid text support, and draws reasonable conclusions about the text. To improve this response, the reader should draw a distinction between the author/poet and the speaker of the poem.


Sample Student Response #5

Student Response

Annotation: The reader responds "she loves carisels because her wording sounds nice" and continues by citing "nice" text from the poem to show that the speaker does love carousels and offering examples of unpleasant descriptions to propose how the speaker could show a dislike for carousels. The reader concludes "her word choice causes her to sound happy." The reader does answer the question and offer text to support that response. To improve this response, the reader should focus on those word choices that show a sense of happiness or love for carousels. For example, the reader might focus on colors, golden, white, silver, and lavender, which are all pleasant to the sight and support the idea of "nice wording" or the actions, gliding, sliding, spinning, circling, whirling etc… which add to the pleasure of the activity. Finally the reader should clarify how those word choices show the speaker's love of carousels.


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

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