School Improvement in Maryland
Sample Item Scoring Information Return

Standard 2.0 Comprehension of Informational Text

Indicator 6. Read critically to evaluate informational text

Objective c. Analyze the text and its information for reliability

Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Item

Read these articles about a secret language, 'Codetalking' and 'The Navajo'. Then answer the following.

Explain how a reader could determine the reliability of the information in the passage from The Navajo? In your response, use information from the article that supports your explanation. Write your answer on your answer document.

Sample Student Response #1

Student Response

Annotation: The student answers that, "one thing that makes this passage sound real is the fact that they show all the navajo words and indian language in a chart." The student does not answer the question about reliability but instead focuses on what is "real." There is text support for what is "real"—the chart of Navajo words in the article. To improve this response, the student should distinguish between what is "real" or nonfiction and what is reliable. The chart of Navajo words could be used as text support if the William Wrigg quote were referenced, and a connection were drawn between the quote and the chart of words that helped save lives. That connection would refer to the reliability of the article's information.


Sample Student Response #2

Student Response

Annotation: The student answers that the reliability of information can be shown "in many different ways." Those ways are that "the story is a nonfiction," "reall peoples names" are used, and "reall dates" are used. The student does answer the question, but the text support is minimal and vague. To improve this response, the student should focus on the names and dates to establish reliability. The student could reference the writer, William Wrigg, and his Air Force Times article and state the dates when statues and exhibits about the codetalkers were made public. Next, the student could draw a conclusion about the public nature of these references and show that because the article, the statues, and the exhibit are available to the public, they help establish the reliability of the article's information.


Sample Student Response #3

Student Response

Annotation: The student answers "there are multiple things you can do to determine the reliability of the information…" Then the student uses specific text support referring to the William Wrigg article, the memorial statue in Phoenix, and the Code Talkers exhibit at the Pentagon. The student suggests that reading the article and visiting the statue and exhibit would be ways of determining reliability. The student does answer the question and does provide specific text support for his/her answer. To improve this response, the student should focus on the text for reliability and remove the suggestion to read the article and visit the statue and exhibit. The student could point out that because the article comes from a military publication, the statue is located in a major American city, and the exhibit is featured in the Pentagon, the center of the American military, that shows the information in the article dependable.


Brief Constructed Response (BCR) Rubric

Print: Scoring Rubric

Score 3

The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text.

  • Addresses the demands of the question
  • Effectively uses text-relevant1 information to clarify or extend understanding

Score 2

The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text.

  • Partially addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses text-relevant1 information to show understanding

Score 1

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text.

  • Minimally addresses the demands of the question
  • Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question

Score 0

The response is completely incorrect, irrelevant to the question, or missing.2

Note 1:

Text-relevant: This information may or may not be an exact copy (quote) of the text but is clearly related to the text and often shows an analysis and/or interpretation of important ideas. Students may incorporate information to show connections to relevant prior experience as appropriate.

Note 2:

An exact copy (quote) or paraphrase of the question that provides no new relevant information will receive a score of "0".

Rubric Document Date: June 2003

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