Practice Activity: Creating Intervention Plans
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Identifying program interventions
 
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The term program interventions used here means that a student’s program is changed in some way. The following examples are used in many schools;
  1. Remedial pull-out classes
  2. G/T pull-out classes
  3. Special education pull-out classes
  4. Resource room pull-out classes
  5. Alternative school placements
Placing students in these programs usually follows a process that originates with the child not performing successfully in the regular classroom. It is usually expected that classroom and extended time strategies have been tried before a program intervention is considered.

One caution in designing program interventions is that they may exclude the student from appropriate grade level instruction. In a standards-based education system, the expectation is that all students attain standards. Equity of opportunity is a guiding principle in moving all students to standard. All students need exposure to good teachers and instruction aimed at high standards. This is more difficult if students get tracked into remedial and alternative classes, and it is often our Hispanic and African American students living in poverty that are disproportionately represented in these classes. Consequently, you will want to evaluate any program intervention to ensure that it is successfully moving students to standard. If it is not, you will want to explore other instructional interventions preferably ones that support students in their regular classrooms.

Some pull-out classes function as extended time interventions because the student participates in their regular classes as well as the intervention program. Pull-out programs that have fewer students that your class size staffing allocation formula are expensive and often constrain your master schedule — another reason why you will want to evaluate your intervention programs.

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Course Overview Module 4 Overview Workshop 9 Overview Workshop Activity site map mdk12